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What is the 'fit to sit' policy?

What is the 'fit to sit' policy?

Important update to the 'fit to sit' policy during the Coronavirus situation:

Queen Mary has partly lifted the fit to sit policy for assessments during the Coronavirus situation. If you attempt an assessment, you may subsequently submit an Extenuating Circumstances (ECs) claim and have it accepted, but you may only do so up to the relevant school/institute’s deadline for submission of ECs which will be earlier than when the results are released. Check the deadline with your school. Additional marks cannot be given for ECs; acceptance of ECs in this circumstance would mean voiding the original attempt and giving you the opportunity to do the assessment as a first sit at the next normally available opportunity. This applies only to assessments taking place in the affected period, not to assessments from earlier in the year.

The information below relates to claims made at times outside of the Coronavirus situation:

Queen Mary University of London has a ‘fit to sit’ policy. This means that if you sit an exam, you are declaring yourself fit to do so. Being ‘fit’ generally means that you are feeling well and functioning effectively. Therefore, if you are feeling unwell because of medical or personal difficulties, you should not sit an exam. If you take an exam knowing that you are unwell, you will not normally be able to successfully claim extenuating circumstances. There are very limited circumstances in which a student can make a successful extenuating circumstances claim after having gone ahead and sat an exam knowing they were unwell. This would normally be limited to situations where a student was so unwell that they were unable to recognise or determine their own ill health, and medical documentation would need to be provided to confirm this.

If you do not sit an exam because you are feeling unwell, you must notify your School and submit a claim for extenuating circumstances. You will need formal documentation to submit with your extenuating circumstances claim so you might need to, for example, see a doctor urgently. This guide includes more information on what documentation you need and how to submit your extenuating circumstances claim; please read the relevant sections.


Disclaimer:
Law, regulations and policies can change quickly. The information on our website is given in good faith and has been carefully checked but QMUL cannot accept responsibility for any errors or omissions. QMUL is not responsible for the content or reliability of the linked websites which are provided for further information.

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